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SALUD (97)

SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — 

 

Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia, casting light on the mystery of what makes the disease tick.

Such work could eventually point to new treatments, although they are many years away. Already, the new results provide the first hard genetic evidence to bolster a theory connecting the immune system to the disease.

More than 100 researchers from around the world collaborated in the biggest-ever genomic mapping of schizophrenia, for which scientists had previously uncovered only about a couple of dozen risk-related genes.

Tuesday, 22 July 2014 20:33
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DANVILLE, Pa. (AP) —

Doctors had a simple goal when they first saw how a football-size rock thrown from an interstate overpass in Pennsylvania had shattered Sharon Budd's skull — to keep her alive.

After nearly two weeks, including a surgery lasting more than 13 hours that involved removing damaged parts of her brain, they are cautiously optimistic.

Screws, bolts and plates now hold together the face of the seventh-grade teacher from Uniontown, Ohio, who was left with a large, gaping wound across her forehead and broken bones when she was struck on July 10.

Tuesday, 22 July 2014 20:28
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LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —

 

There is no concussion-proof football helmet, but manufacturers may soon have to meet new testing standards against certain concussion-causing forces — a step in the quest for more protection.

The organization that sets safety standards for athletic equipment was preparing to adopt the testing criteria on Friday.

It is part of a movement to try to make contact sports safer, as concern about concussions is growing. There's even a new smartphone app to help parents and coaches recognize right away if a player may have a brain injury.

Friday, 20 June 2014 19:58
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MATTHEW DALY, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — 

 

Nearly 80 percent of senior executives at the Department of Veterans Affairs got performance bonuses last year despite widespread treatment delays and preventable deaths at VA hospitals and clinics, a top official said Friday.

Friday, 20 June 2014 19:55
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MARILYNN MARCHIONE, AP Chief Medical Writer

A bold new way to test cancer drugs started Monday in hundreds of hospitals around the U.S. In a medical version of speed dating, doctors will sort through multiple experimental drugs and match patients to the one most likely to succeed based on each person's unique tumor gene profile.

It's a first-of-a-kind experiment that brings together five drug companies, the government, private foundations and advocacy groups. The idea came from the federal Food and Drug Administration, which has agreed to consider approving new medicines based on results from the study.

Tuesday, 17 June 2014 20:09
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MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — 

 

Food companies and restaurants could soon face government pressure to make their foods less salty — a long-awaited federal effort to try to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke.

The Food and Drug Administration is preparing voluntary guidelines asking the food industry to lower sodium levels, FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg told The Associated Press. Hamburg said in a recent interview that the sodium is "of huge interest and concern" to the agency.

Tuesday, 17 June 2014 20:05
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Subburaj Kannan

 

-Biology Division - Science Department

Southwest Texas Junior College,

 

 

Is there such a thing as “long term consequences of overuse of social networking tools”?  Yes. It does exist. It is called “Trigger Thumb Syndrome”.

A few examples of how the general public makes the best use of this 21rst century mile stone, “Texting”.  Instant communications for small things with definite benefits has given rise to new or renewed ailments with catchy names like “iPhoneitis,” “BlackBerry Thumb” and “Droid-digits,” otherwise known as Tendinitis (also called tendonitis).  Unlimited texting plans have been made available by leading carriers. American teenagers sent and received an average of 2,272 text messages per month in the fourth quarter of 2008, according to the Nielsen Company — almost 80 messages a day, more than double the average of a year earlier. 

Friday, 27 December 2013 19:51
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HOUSTON – A clinical trial to look at better ways of managing one of the most common side effects of breast cancer treatments – vaginal dryness – is underway under the auspices of the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine. As breast cancer survival rates continue to improve, the need to better manage side-effects of the long-term, life-saving treatments also grows, said Dr. Polly Niravath, an assistant professor in the Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine and director of the survivorship clinic at the Harris Health System’s Smith Clinic.

Wednesday, 16 October 2013 21:01
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Study Shows Simple Lifestyle Changes Can Trigger Improvements at the Cellular Level Dr. James L. Hardeman has seen firsthand the consequences of unhealthy habits during his 30 years as a practicing physician, and he says they’re just not worth it. “There are very clear, biological reasons why we are compelled to eat sugary, fatty foods; but if there was ever a case of ‘too much of a good thing,’ it’s a sedentary lifestyle coupled with delicious, readily available food,” says Dr. Hardeman, author of “Appears Younger than Stated Age,” (www.jameslhardeman.com), a pragmatic guide to looking younger. As we evolved, sugar, salt and fat were rare yet necessary commodities, and that’s why we enjoy them so much, he says. But there are devastating consequences associated with too much rest, sugar and fat – including heart disease, obesity, diabetes and sleep apnea, he says.

Wednesday, 16 October 2013 20:56
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Dr. James L. Hardeman has seen firsthand the consequences of unhealthy habits during his 30 years as a practicing physician, and he says they’re just not worth it. “There are very clear, biological reasons why we are compelled to eat sugary, fatty foods; but if there was ever a case of ‘too much of a good thing,’ it’s a sedentary lifestyle coupled with delicious, readily available food,” says Dr. Hardeman, author of “Appears Younger than Stated Age,” (www.jameslhardeman.com), a pragmatic guide to looking younger.

Tuesday, 17 September 2013 21:48
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